Volume 17 Part 1 Article 82: A Micro Growing-Unit for Monitoring the Impact of Chromelosporium fulvum on New Casing Materials

Volume 17 Part 1 Article 82
Year 2008
Title: A Micro Growing-Unit for Monitoring the Impact of Chromelosporium fulvum on New Casing Materials
Authors: L.P. van Jaarsveld and L. Korsten

Abstract:

Agaricus bisporus has been commercially cultivated in South Africa since 1940 (Pieterse, 2005). Since then, 35 mushroom farms have been established that produces about 380 tons of button mushrooms per week and approximately 20 000 tons per annum (Country Foods Prospectus, 2007). Although small by world standards, the South African mushroom industry saturates the local market. Today, the mushroom industry in South Africa is pressured to find an alternative casing material for commercial production of A. bisporus due to the loss of non-renewable local peat resources. Pasteurisation of peat has been a common practice in South Africa. Chromelosporium fulvum favours pasteurized wattle bark thereby causing a poor mushroom yield. In addition, it causes respiratory allergies in humans. The objective of this study is therefore to obtain information on the influence of pasteurization on the growth of A. bisporus and C. fulvum. Small scale trials inoculating C. fulvum spores into different alternative casing mediums was investigated in a micro unit.

Please login to download the PDF for this proceeding.