Volume 12 Part 2 Article 2: Effect of Mushroom Cultivation (Pleurotus sajor-caju) on Substrates from Two Non-Conventional Plants, Adhatoda vasica Nees and Ipomoea fistulosa Mart Ex Choicy

Volume 12 Part 2 Article 2
Year 1989
Title: Effect of Mushroom Cultivation (Pleurotus sajor-caju) on Substrates from Two Non-Conventional Plants, Adhatoda vasica Nees and Ipomoea fistulosa Mart Ex Choicy
Authors: A. Singh, P. Vasudevan and M. Madan

Abstract:

Of various microbial processes for conversion of Ugno-cellulosic materials for appropriate utilization, hio-conveision through mushroom cultivation offers the potential of converting nutritionally valueless residues into rich palatable food and residual compost which can be recycled further (Gray 1970; Ghose and Ghosh 1978). Edible mushroom cultivation on non-conventional substrates including biomass from weeds is a rather recent introductiDn (Bisht & Harsh 1984; Gujral et aL 1987). Identification and utilization of boomass from un-or under-explcdted plants to meet the various needs is fast-getting prominence (NAS 1976; Gilreath et aL 1983; Vasudevan et al., 1984; Vasudevan et al., 1987). Weeds aie often considered problematic due to their faster growth potentials and ability to survive under different agrocdimatic conditions. There is a need to exploit this “free crop of nature”. A number of conversion techniques viz. thermal, chemical or biological can be employed through an integrated approach to minimize losses in the utilization of bdomass for fulfilling food, fuel or fertilizer demands.

Adhatoda vasica Nees of family Acanthaceae and Ipomoea fistulosa Mart ex Choicy of family Convolvulaceae are two prolific weedy shrubs, not preferred by grazing animals. Their leaves and twigs are used for green manuring while stem is used as fuel for cooking Uha & Asthana 1977; Singh e t aL 1983). These plants were used as substrate for cultivation of edible mushroom, Pleurotus sajor-caju, commonly known as Dhingri. in Northern India. This spedes of Oyster mushroom has gained popularity due to its ability to grow on a wide variety of cellulosic materials like paddy straw, wood shavings, shredded papers, vegetable and fruit wastes, chapped banana pseudostems and many other agricultural and forestry residues ├ťandaik & Kapoor 1974; Kurtzman 1975; Zadrazil 1975; Kandaswamy & Ramaswamy 1978; Yip 1980; Harsh et aL 1981; Bisaria 1984). The present paper deals with effect of Pleurotus growth on the biomass characteristics of these two plants.

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