Volume 10 Part 2 Article 65: Production and Processing Factors Influencing Potential Thermophilic Spoilage of Canned Mushrooms

Volume 10 Part 2 Article 65
Year 1979
Title: Production and Processing Factors Influencing Potential Thermophilic Spoilage of Canned Mushrooms
Authors: F.J. Me Ardle, R.B. Beelman, A. Ga Vin, A. Abdollahi, and P.J. Wues

Abstract:

Thermophilic spoilage of canned mushrooms and other canned products, caused by growth of heat-resistant bacterial endospores which survive thermal processing, has presented potential problems to processors for decades. This type of spoilage occurs in commercially sterile canned foods when they are subjected to high temperatures during storage and distribution or when they are improperly cooled after thermal processing. Although thermophilic spoilage has no public health significance processors suffer significant economic loss when it occurs in their product. The frequency with which economic spoilage occurs is not well documented, but some indirect indications of its importance are apparent. Spoilage allowances are often included on canned mushroom invoices. Also, the control of thermophilic spoilage was one of the benefits suggested as justification for the acidification of canned mushrooms as petitioned by the industry in the U.S. (U.S. Dept. of Health, Education and Welfare, 1976). Thermophilic spores occur in high numbers on mushrooms (Abdollahi, 1976; Haldeman, 1978). Compost and casing materials are natural sources of thermophilic spores (Fields and Lee, 1975; Stumbo, 1973) and composting practices encourage growth of thermophilic microorganisms of many types (Fordyce, 1970; Canter and Spencer, 1974). Spores of these organisms become a part of the natural microflora of mushrooms.

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