Volume 10 Part 2 Article 24: Mushroom Yield and Incidence of Verticillium Disease as Influenced by the Choice of Casing and Its Treatment with Steam

Volume 10 Part 2 Article 24
Year 1979
Title: Mushroom Yield and Incidence of Verticillium Disease as Influenced by the Choice of Casing and Its Treatment with Steam
Authors: A.C. Happ and P.J. Wuest

Abstract:

In recent years many North American mushroom growers have replaced casing soil with other materials, such as peat moss and spent compost. These newer casing materials are primarily organic matter and are considered easier to manipulate than loam soils by many commercial growers.

Little attention has focused on the value of lower temperature steam when used in commercial mushroom production for pathogen control. Treatment of soil with aerated steam, lower temperature steam, as opposed to steam treatment at 100°C has biological advantages. When loam soil was treated with aerated steam at 60°C the mushroom pathogen Verticillium fungicola (Preuss) Hasselbr. is slowed in its ability to colonize soil (Baker and Olsen 1960). The likelihood of chemical toxicity as a result of pasteurizing at 100°C is reduced, and a portion of the non-pathogenic soil biotica remains Happ and Wuest (1974).

The research reported on concerns the influence of lower temperature (aerated) steam, i.e., below 100°C, treatment on casing as measured in mushroom yield and incidence of Verticillium disease on three casing substrates.

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