Volume 10 Part 1 Article 58: The Nature of Disease Resistance in Strains of the Cultivated Mushroom, Agaricus brunnescens Peck

Volume 10 Part 1 Article 58
Year 1979
Title: The Nature of Disease Resistance in Strains of the Cultivated Mushroom, Agaricus brunnescens Peck
Authors: P.J. Wuest and C.L. Harvey

Abstract:

Disease resistance has not been an important element in research programs which concentrate on mushroom strain development and improvement. One author (Sinden, 1972) allows that the choice of strains by a mushroom farmer is at times predicated on disease resistance, but such strains are “poor varieties” based on their yield potential and the quality of such mushrooms. Few papers exist which delineate the susceptibility of mushroom strains to any one of the numerous mushroom pathogens. Historically, (Lambert, 1932) may have been the first author to mention the subject of resistance, and this report dealt with truffle disease. More current literature (Olivier, Guillaumes, 1976; Van Zaayen, B. Van Der Pol-Luiten, 1977) also deals with the phenomenon of resistance to compost-invading fungi, but the authors fail to address the nature of resistance.

Chrysosporium sp. sensu (Sinden, 1972)] than a white strain, and further recommend use of a non-white strain where “confetti” is endemic. (Harvey, Wuest, 1977) directs her comments to the ability of selected composting-invading fungi to cause disease in the presence of a white, cream, or an off-white strain of Agaricus brunnescens Peck. Aside from these compost-invading fungi, (Van Zaayen, 1976) dealt with the existence of immunity from La France disease in another species of the suscept, A. bitorquis, and suggested that selection of an immune strain may be of considerable assistance when this virus disease is endemic.

These authors have failed to mention the nature of the resistance they described, so the purpose of this manuscript is to define the nature of disease resistance in mushrooms.

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