Volume 10 Part 1 Article 50: Effect of Temperature on the Development of Sporophores of Agaricus bisporus beyond a Cap Diameter of 2 mm

Volume 10 Part 1 Article 50
Year 1979
Title: Effect of Temperature on the Development of Sporophores of Agaricus bisporus beyond a Cap Diameter of 2 mm
Author: P.B. Flegg

Abstract:

Bonner, Kane and Levy (1956) showed that sporophores when growing from about 2 to 10 mm in diameter undergo morphological change. At 2 mm diameter the sporophores consist mainly of a tangled mass of hyphae which, by the time the diameter has reached 10 mm, become orientated radially in the cap and vertically in the stem. Bonner et al. (1956) also claimed that development beyond the 10 mm stage was primarily due to cell elongation, but Craig, Gull and Wood (1977) believe that, while elongation of much of the lower part of the stem can be accounted for by cell elongation, expansion of the upper part is both cell elongation and division.

During the period of morphological change described by Bonner et al. (1956), the response of the young sporophores to temperature also changes (Flegg, 1972). Prior to the sporophores reaching a cap diameter of about 2 mm, they initiate and develop more readily at about 22-24°C than at 16°C, but while expanding from 2 mm a temperature of about 16°C is better. When they have reached 10 mm in diameter the optimum temperature for further expansion, measured either as daily increase in cap diameter or gain in weight is again about 22-24°C, that is, the same temperature range as for spawnrunning. The time taken for sporophores to increase in diameter from 2 to 10 mm is normally several days, but it is not known for how much of that period they require to be at about 16°C. This paper describes two experiments on the effect of temperature on sporophores growing on from the 2 mm stage.

Please login to download the PDF for this proceeding.